Poker Hands by Rank 

Royal Flush

Five cards in a row, 10 through ace, all in the same suit. A royal flush is actually the highest possible straight flush. This is the best hand you can get in a game without wild cards. Since suits have no bearing in poker, two players holding royal flushes would tie. A royal flush ranks above any other straight flush. The illustration shows a royal flush in spades.

Poker Hands
Poker Hands

Straight Flush

Five cards of the same suit in consecutive numerical order. (An ace high straight flush, as 10d Jd Qd Kd AD, is given the special name royal flush.) A straight flush ranks above four of a kind. The illustration shows a five-high straight flush.

Four of a Kind

Four cards of the same rank. Four of a kind ranks above a full house and below a straight flush. The illustration shows four jacks with a deuce kicker (fifth card).

Poker Hands
Poker Hands

Full House

Any three of one rank plus two of another. Often identified by the three of a kind. Three kings and two 3s is a full house, often known as kings full, and sometimes more specifically as kings full of 3s. Ties are broken first by the three of a kind, then the pair. So, for example, 4-4-4-2-2 beats 3-3-3-A-A. In community-card games such as hold'em and Omaha, more than one player can have a full house containing the same three cards of one rank. So, for example, A-A-A-K-K beats A-A-A-Q-Q. A full house ranks above a flush and below four of a kind. The illustration shows 7s full of 3s.

Flush

Five cards of the same suit, not in sequence. A flush is often specified by its top one or two cards. For example, Ah Kh 9h 4h 2h is called an ace-king flush. (Five cards of the same suit in sequence constitutes a special hand known as a straight flush.) A flush rank above a straight and below a full house. The illustration shows a queen-high diamond flush.

Poker Hands
Poker Hands

Straight

Any five consecutive cards of mixed suits. The ace can be high or low. A-K-Q-J-T, an ace-high straight is the highest straight, and 5-4-3-2-A, a5-high straight, is the lowest straight. (Five cards of the same suit in sequence constitutes a special hand known as a straight flush.) A straight rank above three of a Kind and below a flush. The illustration shows a 10-high straight.

Three of a Kind

Three cards of the same rank, plus two other unrelated cards. The hand is often called trips or, in community-card games, a set. Three of a kind ranks above two pair and below a straight. The illustration shows three 4s.

Poker Hands
Poker Hands

Two Pair

Two of one rank, plus two of another rank, plus an unrelated card. For example, A-A-K-K-Q is two pair, known variously as two pair, aces and kings; aces up; aces over; aces over kings; aces and kings; aces and. If both hands have the same high pair, the hand containing the higher second pair wins. For example, A-A-7-7-2 beats A-A-6-6-K. If both pairs tie, the high card wins. For example, A-A-7-7-J beats A-A-7-7-9. Two pair ranks between one pair and three of a kind. The illustration shows 8s and 5s.

Pair

A hand containing two cards of the same rank, plus three other unmatched cards. When two players have the same pair, the highest side card or cards wins. For example, J-J-A-3-2 beats J-J-K-Q-9; 4-4-A-K-2 beats 4-4-A-Q-9; A-A-9-8-7 beats A-A-9-8-6. One pair is the second-lowest category of hand, coming between no pair and two pair. The illustration shows a pair of 9s..

Poker Hands
Poker Hands

No Pair

A hand lower than one pair, usually named by its high card, as, for example, ace high. When two players both have the same high card, the highest side card or cards wins. For example, K-Q-4-3-2 beats K-T-9-8-7; A-K-Q-J-9 beats A-K-Q-J-8. No pair is the lowest category of hand. The illustration shows a king-high hand.